Latina writer of books for kids of all ages.

Photos

2012 Washington, DC via The Open Book Foundation

2012 Washington, DC via The Open Book Foundation

 

Link to Meg’s book trailers on YouTube

PRESS PHOTOS FOR USE BELOW:

Photos for 2016 and beyond. Please credit Petite Shards Productions

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Meg Medina is an award-winning Cuban American author who writes picture books, middle grade, and YA fiction. She lives in Richmond, Va.

photo credit: Petite Shards Production

photo credit: Petite Shards Productions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEB SIZE. Credit to Petite Shards Productions

Meg Medina is an award-winning Cuban American author who writes picture books, middle grade, and YA fiction. She lives in Richmond, Va.

Meg Medina is an award-winning Cuban American author who writes picture books, middle grade, and YA fiction. She lives in Richmond, Va.

 

 

 

 

Photos for 2015: Please credit Steve Casanova for the 2015 images

photographer, Steve Casanova

photographer, Steve Casanova

 

Meg Medina 2015C

 

Photography by Steve Casanova

Photography by Steve Casanova

2013 images: Please use the following photo credit: Petite Shards Productions

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Medina_High07

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high res 
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Comments on: "Photos" (20)

  1. Hi Meg,
    Enjoyed your summer reading suggestions. If you get a chance check out my new picture book YOU’RE MEAN LILY JEAN (Whitman). It’s about bullying but full of humor.
    All the best,
    Frieda Wishinsky
    friedawishinsky.com

  2. Sondi Galanti said:

    Meg,
    After meeting you at University of Alabama’s, 2014 National Latino Children’s Literature Conference this past March, I knew I wanted to help get the word out about one of your latest books, Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass. It was chosen for our May book read, in of my book clubs here in Mobile, AL. While our library system did not own your book (yet), many of us were able to ask for it through Inter-Library Loan. This ended up being a good marketing strategy because now local librarians, the inter-library department and the out of town libraries have all been acquainted with a book they might not have been exposed to. My book club meets tonight and I can’t wait to hear the different discussions on our May read. Also, in our library system, if you have a book that you think the library should have on their shelves, you can file out a form and if there are good reviews on the book, they will consider it for purchase. Please let other Latina writers know about this type of community inclusion.
    I enjoyed meeting you at the conference in March. I look forward to reading more of your books.
    Sondi Galanti

  3. Cassandra said:

    Hello!
    I’m currently a student at Emerson College, and for one of my classes, we have been asked to interview someone in the professional field we wish to be a part of one day. I am currently majoring in Writing, Literature, and Publishing, and hope to one day become a published author. I was wondering if you would mind being interviewed for this project? I received a signed copy of Milagros as a gift several years ago that I still have, and as a fellow Latina, I think it would be interesting (and important) to speak to an author not only about writing, but about diversity in fiction as well.
    I understand if you are very busy, but I would be very be grateful if you could email me an answer soon at cassandra_martinez2@emerson.edu
    Thanks,
    Cassandra Martinez

  4. Melissa Malanuk said:

    Hi Meg,

    We met at the YALSA Lit Symposium in Austin. My name is Melissa and I am the Assistant Coordinator of Youth Services for Queens Library. I couldn’t find your email address on your website to get in touch but want to make sure that you have mine. My email address is mmalanuk@queenslibrary.org. I would love to have you visit Queens Library!

  5. How to get Inspired of writing?

    • Hi Donald! It was great to visit your school this week. To answer your question: My family is spread out in many states…and even some in Cuba. How to get inspired? Usually, I really find writing something I enjoy doing, but when I am stuck I sometimes do something completely different to clear my mind. I also use other art forms, like dance or music or paintings, to help me get back into a new way of thinking.

  6. What book are you making

  7. My sister is reading Tia wants a car

  8. Good morning, Meg! I wanted to follow-up on your Friday workshop and thank you, one more time, for the amazing experience. I’ve attended many writing workshops over the years, but never have I attended one that I know will have such a profound impact on my work. Craft is (relatively speaking) easy to teach and learn; how to find the truth and heart in a story is where the real magic is at, and you did an extraordinary job helping us connect with that aspect of the writing process.

    On another note, I wanted to share with you that I curled up with THE GIRL WHO CAN SILENCE THE WIND last night and find it, of course, riveting. Magical realism is a passion of mine but I’ve yet to find a way to weave it into my own work. I know you are incredibly busy, but I’d love to know if you set out to write a story with magical realism, or if that element of the story crept up on your during the writing process.

    I do hope we have the opportunity to connect again in the future; in the meantime, I’ll be looking forward to the release of BURN, BABY, BURN.

    Best wishes and thanks again!
    Jessica Vitalis (the chess-story lady)

    • Jessica! Thank you so much for this post. I, of course, will always remember you and your chess story. I think everyone in the room will remember it for its boldness and raw tenderness. I thank you so much for sharing it and for making our conversation in the intensive so much deeper. With regard to TGWCSTW…Like you, I admire magical realism, and I especially love exploring it in fiction that is infused with Latino characters. To my thinking, the sacred and magical is expressed in a much closer way to daily life in Latino culture. (Ay que destino! El dicho mio… and other phrases regarding fate, magic the divine) I wanted to create a novel that used magical realism, that leaned into a style also that was romantic and a little epic (a la telenovelas) but that had brain and not just silly ideas about romantic love. But the truth is, that I followed Sonia all over the place…sometimes to places I had to edit out in the edit…and let her story emerge the way it would. Pancho, in particular was a surprise. He was just a single line in the first draft of the work…just a taxi boy giving her a ride. You can see how that turned out. Anyway, so glad you wrote, so happy that you found some substance in what we did together, and very eager to see you on the shelves soon. I’ll be thinking of you and urging you on from here… Cariños, MM.

  9. Thank you for the insights into the magical elements of TGWCSTW (that’s a mouthful!) … I can’t wait to see how it all comes together at the end (and urge anyone who hasn’t read it to do so without delay!).

  10. Crystal Guest said:

    Hello Ms. Medina,

    My name is Crystal and I am currently an English major at California State University Fullerton (CSUF) in Fullerton, California. My dream is to be a high school English teacher, preferably at a Continuation High School. I have an assignment in one of my English classes to do a book review. I chose your book “Yaqui Delgado Wants To Kick Your Ass” because I felt a connection with it, especially Piddy. I’ve done a lot of work with troubled adolescents. For two years my husband and I were live-in house parents at a group home for abused and neglected children. Our home was full of boys ages 7-18. It had its challenges but I fell in love with helping the children that felt like they’ve been forgotten. Part of the assignment is to include an Author’s Biography. I was wondering if you would possibly answer a question for me? It would be great if I could include your answer in the Biography! That question is: when you were young and going through your experience with the bullies at your school you mentioned that you started going down the wrong path at one point. What made you decide to stop going down that path and become a teacher and an author? Was there a transformative “fork in the road” that turned your life into what it is today? Thank you so much for taking time from your busy schedule to answer my question!

    Sincerely,
    Crystal Guest

  11. Crystal Guest said:

    Hello Ms. Medina,

    My name is Crystal and I am currently an English major at California State University Fullerton (CSUF) in Fullerton, California. My dream is to be a high school English teacher, preferably at a Continuation High School. I have an assignment in one of my English classes to do a book review. I chose your book “Yaqui Delgado Wants To Kick Your Ass” because I felt a connection with it, especially Piddy. I’ve done a lot of work with troubled adolescents. For two years my husband and I were live-in house parents at a group home for abused and neglected children. Our home was full of boys ages 7-18. It had its challenges but I fell in love with helping the children that felt like they’ve been forgotten.

    Part of the assignment is to include an Author’s Biography. I was wondering if you would possibly answer a question for me? It would be great if I could include your answer in the Biography! That question is: when you were young and going through your experience with the bullies at your school you mentioned that you started going down the wrong path at one point. What made you decide to stop going down that path and become a teacher and an author? Was there a transformative “fork in the road” that turned your life into what it is today? My email is crystalguest@yahoo.com.

    Thank you so much for taking time from your busy schedule to answer my question!

    Sincerely,
    Crystal Guest

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