Latina writer of books for kids of all ages.

Posts tagged ‘Matt de la Peña’

#NCTE2018 Houston: Let the Brainy Parranda Begin

It’s here! NCTE! 

We’re in Houston, where the hispanic or Latinx population is around 43%. So I’m thrilled that most of the panels and round tables where I’ll be speaking are centered squarely on the Latinx experience. From nerds to bad-ass girls – here they are:

Thursday, Nov 16, 2018

1:00-2:15 Latinx Experiences in Classrooms and Communities: Knowing Our Students through Text-Based Conversations across Picture Books, Middle Grade, and YA Book Clubs (Organized by Dr. Carla España) with Luz Herrera, NoNieqa Ramos,  Lilliam Rivera, Meg Medina,  R. Joseph Rodríguez Room 362 DEF

Friday, Nov 17, 2018

The Nerdtalk Speakers Summer 2018

9:30-10:45 a.m. Nerdy Book Club: Building Strong, Inclusive Reading Communities Chairs: Donalyn Miller and Colby Sharp. Room 340 AB 

11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m. “Más Fuerte Together: A Roundtable on the state of Latinx Publishing & Readers.” Roundtable 5: Girl Power, “Latinidad, and the Contemporary YA Novel: Where it All Meets, with Meg Medina and Lilliam Rivera.” Room 352 DEF

2:00-3:15 p.m. “Policy and Governance: Teachers as Advocates, Creating Change from the Ground Up” Speaking on “Using Latinx Literature to Connect Students to Their History, Power, and Voice,” with Meg Medina, Juana Martinez-Neal and Cindy L. Rodriguez  Room 352 DEF 

4:30 – 5:30 pm. Signing at Candlewick booth #223

Saturday, Nov 18

12:30-1:45 p.m. “Fierce: A Conversation with Five Authors Writing Strong Latinas”  Organized by Lilliam Rivera (includes Lilliam Rivera, Meg Medina, Elizabeth Acevedo, Isabel Quintero) Room 361 EF

2:45-4:00 p.m. “Beyond Baseball, Basketball, and Día de los Muertos: Depicting the Everyday Lived Realities of Diverse Families in Children’s Picture Books” Chair: Angie Zapata (CLA), with Meg Medina, Matt de la Peña, Derrick Barnes, Karla Möller, Dan Santat  Room 362 ABC

7- 9 pm. Latinx in Publishing free social. (See info below)*

Sunday, Nov 19

10:00 – 11:15 am “Community and Collective Action through Recent Latinx Children’s Literature” With Noni Ramos,   Margarita Engle, Emma Otheguy, Meg Medina, David Bowles Room 361 EF

*Kick back and join us for a free social on Saturday night. The night is going to be emceed by Pablo Cartaya, so ya saben, it’s going to to be great. Snacks, authors, readings, chisme. ¿Para que decirles?  But please RSVP here so we know what to expect.  

 

And finally, please don’t forget to say hello to authors at their signings. Here is Candlewick’s line up below. Mine is Friday, 4:30 – 5:30, but check out the other action at the booth (#223) all weekend, too.

 

 

See you there! Safe travels!

 

 

 

 

Yaqui, Pura Belpré and Me

Here is what it looks like when a dream comes true. photo

This blurry “selfie” was taken on a Richmond-bound Amtrak train, two minutes after getting the news that I had won the 2014 Pura Belpré Award. I was on my way home from the ALA Midwinter Conference on Sunday night when my cellphone rang and Ruth Tobar, chair of the selection committee, gave me the good news. I was  promptly sworn to secrecy until the next day. Obviously, Gigi guessed what all my Spanish and crying was about; thank goodness she’s a steel trap.

Yaqui with medalThank you so much, everyone, for the tsunami of good wishes. (And thank you, Ms. Espinal, President of REFORMA (the ALA’s affiliate group that focuses on library services for Latino youth and families) for saying “ass” with such courage and gusto from the podium!) It’s an honor beyond belief to receive this award alongside some of the most talented people working in children’s publishing today. (Full list of ALA Youth Media winners here.) Un abrazo fuerte for: Yuyi Morales, Margarita Engle, Matt De la Peña, Duncan Tonatiuh, Angela Dominguez, and Rafael Lopez.

Pura Belpré winner for illustration

Pura Belpré winner for illustration

Margarita Engle Matt de la Peña

pancho rabbit Tito Puente by Monica Brown MariaLlama

Other pieces of good news continue to come in for YAQUI,  but for now I’m off to a Banned Books and Brews event at Longwood University this weekend to help raise funds for the Virginia Children’s Book Festival which will bring some pretty big names to Virginia in the fall. A drink doesn’t sound like such a bad idea right about now.

¡Salud!

(Check out the awards. FYI, the Pura Belpré starts just after 38)

Latino reads for you

Last Saturday I did a Hispanic Heritage presentation at Richmond’s Fountain Bookstore. Here is the list a couple of you have asked for. These are some of my favorite Latino reads, oldies and new releases, from picture books to adults. I could list dozens more, but here is a start. Feel free to add recommendations in the comments section. (P.S. Fountain had most of these titles on their shelves, so give them a call.)

Picture books 

Los Gatos Black on Halloween by Marisa Montes and Yuyi Morales

A poetic spanglish romp on Halloween night. Gorgeous illustrations. Fantastic bilingual vocabulary

http://marisamontes.com and http://yuyimorales.com

La Cazuela That the Farm Maiden Stirred by Samantha Vamos

A farm maiden decides to make arroz con leche – rice pudding. Energetic, bilingual vocabulary, gorgeous illustrations.

www.samanthavamos.com

Martina the Beautiful Cockroach, by Carmen Agra Deedy

Carmen is a storyteller of Cuban origins. Also the author of Growing Up Cuban in Decatur Georgia. This is a classic folktale about how to find the right mate in life. The illustrations are gorgeous and the text gets at kids funny bone.

http://carmenagradeedy.com/

My Name is Gabriela by Monica Brown

Brown presents a beautiful bilingual biography of Chilean poet Gabriela Mistral. In 1945, Mistral became the first Latin American woman to receive the Nobel Prize for literature.

http://www.monicabrown.net

Middle Grade 

The Dreamer by Pam Muñoz Ryan and Peter Sis

This middle grade novel is about the early life of poet Pablo Neruda. It is written in a style that parallels Neruda’s THE BOOK OF QUESTIONS. Here Muñoz weaves Neruda’s love of the natural world, his struggle against his father, and the sounds of poetry in the every day and ordinary.

http://www.pammunozryan.com

Before We Were Free by Julia Alvarez

A look at the savage presidency of Trujillo (Dominican Republic) through the eyes of 12-year-old Anita. Excellent historical fiction.

http://www.juliaalvarez.com

The Firefly Letters by Margarita Engle 

Margarita Engle’s work captures historical fiction through verse. In the Firefly Letters, she retells the life of Fredrika Bremer, a Swedish suffragette who traveled to Cuba in 1851. It’s a slim book that touches on women’s rights and slavery tucked inside often forgotten history.

http://margaritaengle.com/

Young Adult

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

Published in 1984, this is the classic coming-of-age YA story told through interwoven short stories. Fierce and gritty. Often taught in schools.

The Surrender Tree by Margarita Engle

The Cuban War for Independence as told through the eyes of Rosa, who knows how to heal sickness with medicines made from wild plants. (Herbera). In verse. Creates amazing tension and characters in this look at war.

http://margaritaengle.com/

We Were Here by Matt de la Peña

Miguel finds himself in juvie and eventually on the run from the law on his way to Mexico. Gritty characters, funny and tragic. Matt creates full characters and shows their humanity as they try to find forgiveness and redemption.

http://www.mattdelapena.com/

Dark Dude by Oscar Hijuelos

(author of The Mambo Kings…) Racism. The narrator is a Cuban in NYC during the 1970s, where being light-skinned has its problems. Runs away to Wisconsin, only to find a new kind of racism.

The Red Umbrella by Cristina Gonzalez

Cuba 1961 – The Peter Pan flights – during which parents sent their children to live with American families in order to give them a chance to escape Cuba.

http://www.christinagonzalez.com

Adult

Caramelo by Sandra Cisneros

An annual family trip from Chicago to Mexico City descends into generational family storytelling that really tries to find out why Awful Grandmother got to be awful. Funny and powerful.

http://www.sandracisneros.com/

The Sum of Our Days by Isabel Allende

Non-fiction about her life. Picks up where Paula left off. Unflinching look at herself – endearing, appalling, fabulous in every way.

http://www.isabelallende.com/

Women with Large Eyes by Angeles Mastretta (in translation)

Mexican writer. Amazing group of stories that feature strong women.

The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz

Stunning, sexy, and funny. Through the most creative use of footnotes I’ve ever seen, Junot gives us a history of the Dominican Republic against a sad-sap story set in Washington Heights today.

http://www.junotdiaz.com/

In Her Absence by Antonio Muñoz Molina

Molina is a highly decorated writer from Spain, but he is only now gaining a reputation here in the states. In this short novel, Mario López is working as a draftsman in the small city of Jaén. The novel chronicles his passionate and painful relationship with Blanca, his artistic and wandering wife of six years.

Before Night Falls by Reynaldo Arenas

Memoir that describes life inside Castro’s Cuba for gay writers.  Set in the 1970s and early 80s. Powerful and tragic – and a testament to the artistic spirit.